Symposium Photo Gallery: 2015

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Gary Estes, Symposium Coordinator and Founder, welcoming nearly 180 people to the 2015 California Extreme Precipitation Symposium.
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Melissa Collard, Senior Engineer, Division of Safety of Dams, California Department of Water Resources, presenting the Special Recognition Award to Ralph B. Hwang, for his influential guidance to thousands of students in water resources engineering and his extensive applied research in inundation mapping and streamflow/runoff modeling.
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Armin Munévar set up the theme for the day with his presentation on how flood risks are changing in California's Central Valley due to climate change and human modifications. Changing Flood Risks in the Central Valley
 
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David Lavers introduced us to the idea that forecasting water vapor transport might be used to better predict atmospheric rivers, the primary source of extreme precipitation and flood events in California. Atmospheric Rivers in California: Climate Change Projections and Potential for Earlier Warnings
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Mike Anderson discussed how the topology of the San Joaquin River Basin may impact flooding as temperature increases result in higher freezing elevations and the resulting runoff into the major tributaries increases accordingly. Sensitivity of San Joaquin River Basin Floods to Temperature Increases
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Ben Tustison provided insights into how climate change considerations are impacting flood management system improvement planning. Integrating Climate Change in Regional Floodplain Management Planning
 
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Elizabeth (Betty) Andrews identified strategies which address both climate change impacts and loss of California's native species when designing water supply and flood management solutions. Trading Ecological Problems for Climate-Resilient Solutions
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Amy Bindra shared the three strategic categories of management actions to address climate change and other stressors of the Central Valley's flood management system: raising levees, increasing flood storage, and expanding bypasses. Analyzing Options for Responding to Central Valley's Future Flood Risks
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Left to right: Ben Tustison, David Lavers, Elizabeth (Betty) Andrews, and Armin Munévar chat with Mike Anderson and the Symposium attendees on the topic: Science Informing 2017 Central Valley Flood Protection Plan: What is Needed? What is Missing?.